Jul 27, 2010

Acoustics: solid or laminated

Calling all Jedson acoustic owners,

Can you please examine the back and sides of your guitars and try to determine whether yours has laminated wood or solid?  I believe, based on examination of my own, that these acoustics are made of solid wood from top to back. I am 100% sure that the tops are solid spruce.

Apparently, all of the Jedson (and other Terada-made) guitars of the period have laminate sides and back. The higher-end models have solid tops. A few models (mainly early ones or cheaper) have laminated tops. From what I have seen, the T1000 is a cheaper version of the F907. The T1000 has a laminated top versus the solid top on the F907.

8 comments:

Straggs said...

My 9000 acoustic is made of 100% solid wood & seems to be made to a high standard compared to other Japanese guitars from the 70's

my brother has a Eko J52 from the late 60's & this is every bit as good as my 9000, Eko guitars are also underrated so are very cheap for their quality.

I know your question was about acoustics but as a matter of record I own a "true" strat Jedson, this is solid wood to & also very high quality, vastly superior to modern Strat copys.
I also own a black Les Paul Jedson but this is laminated & generally much lower quality construction.

Mark E said...

What do you mean when you say your LP is laminated? Is it a thin vaneer over a cheap hardwood? What about the flame maple top versions?

Straggs said...

When I say that my Les Paul copy is Laminated this is a polite way of saying that the top is a toneless piece of plywood, this is clearly visible through the pickup holes, I think the rest of the body is solid but made of low grade wood with a very coarse grain, the guitar is also light for its size.
The quality of the fittings & electrics is also poor, I had to replace the tuners & bridge pickup on mine to make it usable, there is not enough travel on the saddles to allow for correct intonation, the overall sound is flat & lifeless.
Having said all that these guitars were only ever intended to be cheap beginners instruments & were retailed through shops like Woolworths at a very reasonable price.
As with the acoustic models the electrics show significant differences depending on the year of manufacture, for example my Les Paul is a very early model & as such the fret marker inlays stop at 17th fret, the later ones go up to 21st the body end of the neck is rounded off whereas the later ones are square more like a real Les Paul & the tailpiece on the later models had “C” section mounting holes to allow removal without completely unscrewing the bolts, mine does not.
As for the Flame top Les Pauls I have never been lucky enough to meet one in person so can’t really comment, the pictures I have seen seem to show that the fittings & electrics are of a higher quality than mine, I am also aware that some versions have a standard four bolt arrangement holding the neck on whereas some have a strange system with only two bolts.
In short I think the Jedson buyers sourced instruments from whoever offered the best deal at the time.

Ian the Dog said...

Staggs - Looking at the 9000 pics, I don't see a join in the back. Surely if it's a solid back it has to be in at least 2 pieces? Or is yours different from those shown on the site?

Mark E said...

Here is a very old parlor guitar that I am restoring/reconstructing. The back is solid but it's two pieces with no back strip. There is no inside back brace where the two pieces join. The guitar is pretty old, so the bracing is not the best. I am redoing all of the bracing including a new top/brace pattern.

http://www.pbase.com/image/129538631/original.jpg

Ian the Dog said...

Beautiful - are you a professional luthier? I take your point, but would you build a dreadnaught that way? Surely such a joint would be very fragile without a strip.

Anonymous said...

I would guess that my 9000 has laminated sides and back, and a solid spruce top, which makes it a low to mid range instrument in today's market. It sounds simply excellent. I wonder how they did it?

Anonymous said...

My JW837 is 100% all solid woods. Spruce top with a 3 piece maple back (the center being flamed and outer wings plain) and flamed maple sides. The bridge and fretboard seem to be rosewood allthough the bridge seems to have been dyed but its wearing away and looks like rosewood. All inlays and logos are real mother of pearl. Closed Gotoh tuners. 1 piece mahogany neck. Serial # 125084 and is inside on the heel block with 837 stamped below it.